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Posts Tagged ‘Informational’

Nantucket as a Duty Station!

In Information-Interesting on April 10, 2011 at 6:45 pm
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Charles M. Morgan-Whaling Ship

The last year of my enlistment (1953) was fantastic. I was assigned to the Loran station at Siasconset on Nantucket Island , off the coast of Massachusetts.  We rented a two bedroom house right on the beach in Siasconset, between the ocean and the bluffs. What a stroke of luck we had here. In looking for a place to bring my wife with our  five month old  son, I came across a  Lady (who lived off of the Island) and who had just bought an old house that had not been lived in for the past ten years, as an investment. I needed a house to live in and she needed her investment  fixed up. We came to an agreement. She would buy the necessary supplies and I would repair and paint the inside of the house. I would also paint the outside trim and make any other repairs necessary.In exchange I would pay a very reasonable rent.

We absolutely fell in love with Nantucket and with the Islanders. We met and became friends with several families. We had  cook outs and played cards with our new friends and covered about every part of the island from lighthouses to swimming beaches.We found relatives I didn’t know we had, wanting to visit for a week- end during the summer!. In the winter we collected driftwood and any thing else that came ashore after a storm. We hired out in the spring to help the summer people to open their homes, doing cleaning , painting and small repairs in our spare time.

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Here are some very brief facts  and history of Nantucket Island!

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Nantucket cobble stone streets

The National Historic District  has architecturally changed very little since the 17th century.  Seaside cottages and old-fashioned lamps still line its streets.

The three Brothers Buildings

At the harbor front, where the great whaling ships set out on their hazardous journeys to return years later – if at all -is now filled with  pleasure boats that find safe harbor in one of the finest docking facilities in the world.

When you go inland on this idyllic “elbow of sand,” the wild moors open to the endless sky. Nearly 40 percent of Nantucket Island is protected conservation land. Several areas and habitats, natural groups of plants and animals, are rare to this region and even the world.

Walk the wide sandy beaches, as beautiful as any in the world. Swim in the still, cool, sparkling waters of Nantucket Sound to the north. Sign on for a guided tour of the island or pick up a picnic lunch and rent a bike or a jeep and discover Nantucket  for yourself. (A 4-wheel jeep will get you to places that you can not possibility take a car without getting stuck in the beach sand).

Restaurants abound whether for a beach picnic, an informal meal, or gourmet fare in sophistic surrounding, there is something for everyone. How about a clambake prepared to your order. Fresh Nantucket bay scallop, provides unforgettable dining.

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Originally a booming whaling port, Nantucket has been named a National Historic District and has architecturally changed little since the 17th century.

The island’s beginnings in western history can be  traced to its reported sighting by Norsemen in the 11th century. But  it was not until 1602  that Captain Bartholomew Gosnold of  Falmouth, England sailed his bark, Concord, past the bluffs of Siasconset and really put Nantucket on the map. The island’s  original inhabitants, the Wampanoag Indians, lived undisturbed until 1641 when the island was deeded by the English (the authorities in control of the land from the coast of Maine to New York) to Thomas Mayhew and his son, merchants of Watertown and Martha’s Vineyard.

As Europeans began to settle in the area around Cape Cod, the island became a place of refuge for regional Indians, as Nantucket was not yet discovered by white men. The growing population of  Native Americans welcomed seasonal groups of  Indians who traveled to the  island to fish and later harvest whales that washed up on shore. At this time, the true demise of the island’s Indian population began. The English presence drastically changed the healthy Indian population and over the next century, the Wampanoag would be weakened by disease, alcohol and servitude.

Before ultimately settling on the shores of the Great Harbor, the new English settlers moved to the land surrounding the small sheltered harbor of Capaum Pond, on the north shore, where the first white settlement, Sherburne, was established. In 1795, the town (now nestled on the Great Harbor) was named Nantucket (Wampanoag for “faraway land”) and became unique in the country as an island, a county and a town, all with the same name. Shortly after 1700, Quakerism began to take root and by the end of the eighteenth century, the  society of friends was the major denomination on the island, a refuge for Quakers being persecuted in other areas of the Bay Colony. The Nantucket Quakers also became extremely influential in business and government matters. The simple, sturdy dwellings have been continuously occupied and stand today in pristine ranks along cobblestone Main Street and other lanes and byways. Later, with the influence generated by the whaling industry, merchants and  master mariners built their homes with an eye to impress their neighbors.

For nearly a 100 years-from the mid-1700’s to the late 1830’s, the island was the whaling capital of the world ,  with as many as 150 ships making port in Nantucket during its peak. Within decades, however, the new wealth from whale oil drastically took a turn for the worst, upon the advent of petroleum in 1838 when it began to replace whale oil as an illuminate, and the sperm whale itself had been harder to find. In 1846, a “Great Fire” roared through Nantucket Town under the cover of night, leaving hundreds homeless and impoverished. When gold was discovered in California, shiploads of Nantucketers left to seek new fortunes. In the thirty years of 1840 to 1870, census figures document the loss of 60 percent of the island’s population, which plunged from an estimated 10,000 to 4,000. The death knell for whaling had been sounded. The last ship outbound from Nantucket in search of the giant sperm whale left in 1869, never to return to her home port.

Passenger Ship

Nantucket Island

Nantucket was a port-of-call for transatlantic packets and coastal vessels from the early 1800’s and, indeed, ranked third only after New York and Boston as a  major port. When the whaling era ended, commercial shipping gave way to recreational boating. Daily excursions from the mainland on the graceful old steamers brought a new breed to Nantucket – the summer visitors. The first generation of “developers” on Nantucket sang the praises of pure air and saltwater bathing for health and pleasure. They built cottages and summer houses, advertising them in the Boston and New York newspapers. Island housewives took in summer boarders and great hotels were built in town, as well as on the seashore at Brant Point, Surfside, and Siasconset. It was not until around 1990 that the american tradition of summer vacations was firmly established, and it was then that Nantucket was discovered to be just about the ideal spot for vacationing. Once entrenched, tourism became the principle source of income for island residents. It still is and in the last two decades Nantucket’s tourist season has extended from before Memorial Day to after Columbus Day, Increasingly, visitors are also attracted by the quiet beauty of the off-season, and can be assured of finding comfortable accommodations no matter what time of year.

A word of caution if you are driving on the “cobblestone” streets of Nantucket, drive slow! The cobblestones’ will jar your teeth loose!

(Most of the above information  came from Nantucket Island Chamber of Commerce.

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My wife says that SHE and I want to go to Banff,Alberta – 2 of 2

In Humor, Information-Interesting, postaweek2011, RVing on February 2, 2011 at 1:48 am

We left early today, mostly because Dick has a lot of uncertain feelings about driving up into unknown mountains to a popular tourist town with a 36 ft  5th wheel behind us. In spite of his feelings, we did head out for Banff. ( I don’t know if the fact that June was driving had anything to do with that decision or not). June drove an uneventful 150 miles. We stopped in a Truck stop for diesel and lunch after we had passed through Calgary. Today was the hottest day of the year at 33.3 degrees Celcius (about 93 degrees F) The radiator on the truck knew the difference, it

Banff,Ave

stayed right up there near the top. Coming into Banff we missed our turn. It said to turn off  TCH-1 on to Banff Ave.We could not find any such turn. We should have turned into Banff, which becomes Banff Ave. We had to turn around several miles up TCH-1 in a construction area, and come back to town. We took the wrong entrance into town (there are only two, so that  figures)  and ended up driving right straight up the center of the Banff tourist area towing a 36ft RV, to the campground. We got in line for about 20 minutes, or so, and  then we got checked in. No full hook-up sites left for rigs our size. They gave us a beautiful site with 30 Amp only for tonight and told us to ask for a full hook-up site tomorrow after 8:00 am when people start leaving.

 

Bow River Falls

This is us on the right parking over-night

(8/7/97)I was the only  one in line at 8:30 am , the next morning. We got a beautiful full hook-up site under the trees(remember the heat wave) with a , not so great view, of the mountains. There are Elk roaming all over this campground & feeding everywhere. The Elk have the right of way on the golf course. It is fun watching the golfers encouraging the Elk to move over out of the way with their golf carts and waving their arms. The Elk  also roam around the RVs under the trees and they are not afraid of you. The Elk have food and safety in the town and, of course the Wolves will not come into town after the Elk.

Elk on the golf course

Elk from our window

There is a Bus stop here at the campground that will take you to town. In town parking is very tight. After the first time of driving into town to have lunch and to pick-up all the area information that we could find, we decided that the Bus was a better choice. $1.00 each way. Banff is certainly a very popular tourist town. Tourist are everywhere. We checked in at the Visitors center, which we try to do at most of our stops where we plan to spend a couple of days. We watched a couple of videos on Banff and the surrounding area. There is a very plain warning that they give to all tourist that stop there. It  is;” DO NOT GET NEAR OR TOUCH THE ANIMALS”! They do look so cute and friendly…but they are “WILD”, and therefore,”DANGEROUS “! “IT IS  AGAINST THE LAW TO FEED THEM. THEY WILL ATTACK YOU IF THEY FEEL THREATEN”. I guess there are a lot of people who either do not go the Visitors Center, or just can not believe that these friendly Elk are dangerous or maybe THEY ARE JUST PLAIN STUPID.  We watched a lot of  silly people walk down in among the Elk that were  grazing or laying down, to have their picture taken petting an Elk. One guy tried putting his arm around an Elks neck, but the Elk wouldn’t have any part of that idea. The darn fool could have easily been gored by the Elk. “REMEMBER, IDIOT-THEY ARE WILD!” After we got back to our RV (home), I took a picture out through our  window of an Elk grazing.

(8/9/97) Today is “Banff Day”. Our first stop was at Joe Btifsplick’s for breakfast. We found that the public parking lots are only half full in the mornings. We set out for the “cave & basin”, which is the original hot springs from which Banff became a town. We joined a guided tour and learned how two brothers and a friend found the “Hot Spring Basin”, then “The Hot Spring Cave”, from a hole in the ground.The two springs are not connected.

After that tour, we drove to Sulphur Mountain where we took the Gondola up to the top. It is so popular that we had to wait about 20 minutes in line just to get on the Gondola. The Gondola goes up 7,500 feet to the top. Once at the top, there is a large enclosed building  glassed in all around for comfortable warm viewing all around. There is a snack bar and a  restaurant and bathroom facilities. The view from up here is fantastic. I got some great pictures of the mountains and of Banff, way, way, way down there. just a tiny little spot . We stayed up there for an hour or so , and then came down to the “Banff Springs Hotel”, which is a very impressive building. On the lawn were about 20 Elk. We finally located Bow River Falls. The Falls is so popular that I had to let June out so she could video tape it, then I picked her back up. We had a very full day, and we really enjoyed it. We will be ready to leave tomorrow just to rest. If you ever get the chance to visit Banff….do it, you will be glad that you did. I am “almost sorry” that I put so many photos on this blog, but it was just so beautiful that I couldn’t help myself. Thank you June, my love, I am glad that you steered me in this direction! It was certainly well worth while.

Lake Moraine and Ten Peaks

Gondola to Sulphur Mountain

Banff Springs Hotel

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Eight inches of snow?
This one had most of the state of Michigan laughing for two days,and a very embarrassed female news anchor who will, in the future, likely think before she speaks.What happens when you predict snow, but don’t get any? We had a female news anchor who, the day after it was suppose to have snowed and didn’t, turned to the weatherman and asked: ” So Bob,where’s that 8 inches you promised me last night? Not only did he have to leave  the set, but half the crew did too, they were laughing so hard !

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Dyslexia-A curse on the innocent???

In Information-Usefull on October 31, 2010 at 1:47 am

This is a “must read” blog for anyone who has trouble reading “technical” information & has to re-read it several times to understand what it says. One who has always considered himself “not quite as swift” as most people but one who can actually can do any thing that others do. It just takes a little longer.If, after reading this, you feel as if you may be dyslextic, you are not alone. 5% to 17 % of the people in this country have the same problem.

Be sure to read-Share 102   Famous People who are dyslexic  or have dyslexia, at the end of this blog’ —It is a “must read”! You will be surprised at who the people were and the challenges they over-came!!

I am one of them as well is my wife, one son and one brother-we all have dyslexia. We learned about “Dyslexia” when our son’s teacher informed us that she was going to have to keep him back in the 6th grade because he wasn’t keeping up with the class. Also, at that time, we were given the name of a woman who specialized in teaching students who have a  problem with dyslexia, and how to compensate for it. Gary had ten-one hour sessions on learning to cope with his problem. (Believe me, for an eleven year old child it was pretty frustrating, but it did help).We enrolled him into a private school that coming year, with a teacher-to-stunent ratio of ten students per teacher.The private school was 35 to 40 miles away and had living quarters for the students. (The schooling cleaned out our savings…. and it was worth every penny).

You can not cure Dyslexia-there is no cure! What you can do is to equalize the playing field!
Equalize the playing field! Just how do I do that?  First, you have to accept the fact that  “YOU ARE NOT DUMB”! ” YOU ARE NOT STUPID”! Then you ask, if I am not ‘dumb or stupid’, what am I? Very good question! For the answer  I went to the internet and found;

Mayo Clinic.com/dyslexia:
Dyslexia is an impairment in your brain’s ability to translate written images received from your eyes into meaningful language. Also called specific reading disability, Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in children.This statement best describes Dyslexia as it affects me and probably most others. What this is saying is; “What you see is not always what you think it is”.  Here is an simple example of word reversal ; “Jack saw the big bully”. What a person with dyslexia might see with word reversal is this ; “Jack was the big bully.”In his mind a word reversal took place, but he  does not know it. The word “saw” was reversed going to  his brain, into “was” coming out .This, of course, changes the meaning of the sentence and may  not make sense in the story. An older person would stop and go back and reread the sentence. A child in the 1st or 2nd grade would continue to read on trying to make sense, not realizing that he must have mis-read a word. The results is frustration. This is called word reversal. You also have letter reversal and number reversal. What comes easy to a normal student is a constant battle for the poor child with dyslexia. Be patient and give them the help that they need and they will make you proud.

Share102
Famous People who are Dyslexic or had DyslexiaHomeEntertainment
By Disabled World – 2008-01-17A list of famous and well known people who are and have been Dyslexic.* * *What is Dyslexia?Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that manifests primarily as a difficulty with written language, particularly with reading and spelling.Although dyslexia is the result of a neurological difference, it is not an intellectual disability. Dyslexia occurs at all levels of intelligence, average, above average, and highly gifted.Dyslexia is most commonly characterized by difficulties with learning how to decode at the word level, to spell, and to read accurately and fluently.There is no cure for dyslexia, but dyslexic individuals can learn to read and write with appropriate education or treatment.There is wide research evidence indicating that specialized phonics instruction can help remediate the reading deficits.In the United States, researchers estimate the prevalence of dyslexia to range from five to nine percent of school-aged children, though some have put the figure as high as 17 percent.A list of famous people who are Dyslexic or had Dyslexia:

Agatha Christie – (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976) Agatha Christie was the world’s best selling book writer of all times only truly surpassed by the Bible and equaled by Shakespear, her books sold approximately 4 billion copies worldwide. Agatha suffered from dyslexia but in no way did it stop her from being creative and learning how to write, her mystery novels have always been some of the most captivating of all times. Her bestselling book was without a doubt “And then there was none” which was a source of inspiration for novelists and movie makers even many years after.

Albert Einstein – (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) Being one of the most important great minds of his century Albert Einstein was then known to suffer from dyslexia mainly because of his bad memory and his constant failure to memorize the simplest of things. He would not remember the months in the year yet he would succeed in solving some of the most complicated mathematical formulas of the time without any trouble. He may have never learned how to properly tie his shoelaces but his scientific contributions and theories still have a major effect on all of todays current knowledge of science.

Alexander Graham Bell – (3 March 1847 – 2 August 1922) Well known as the inventor of the telephone Alexander was actually attempting to find a way that could make deaf people hear. His mother was slowly becoming deaf when Alexander was only 12 years old making him extremely sensitive to disabilities. Once older he was constantly seeking a way to cure them through technology. He himself had dyslexia which would cause him problems at school, but he always kept his interest for science, especially biology. He would show a great indifference for everything else and would have poor grades. Today Alexander Graham Bell is also well know as one of the founders of the National Geographic society.

Cher – (Born May 20, 1946) Cher was a fatherless child and was most of the time very poor. Her mother tried to make money by singing and acting which ultimately brought Cher to follow into her footsteps. Due to dyslexia cher decided she would quit school and try to take some acting lessons in Los Angeles to finally do what she loved. One day while at the renowned Aldo’s Coffee Shop her life changed upon meeting Sonny Bono, which was at the time successful in show business. They eventually made songs together and through fantastic duos with Sonny. The beginning of Cher’s lifetime career was at birth.

Dale S. Brown – Dale Brown is a strategic leadership consultant at Washington D.C and an author. Her most recent book is called “Steps to Independance for people with Learning Disabilities” which was published by Learning Disabilities Association of America in 2005. Dale suffers herself from dyslexia and wants to tell the world that learning disabilities does not have to stop you from being who you want to be. It does not have to stop you from striving or harm your capabilities to integrate to everyday life

Danny Glover – (Born July 22, 1947) A great actor in both Lethal Weapon with Mel Gibson and Predator 2. Danny Glover suffered dyslexia at school when he was younger and the school staff would label him retarded. This definitely was not very encouraging for him but he ended up finding ways to feel better about himself. He says that dyslexia had given him the feeling that he was not worthy to learn and that the people around him would not care of what would happen to his education. With time he eventually regained his self esteem and became a great actor.

George Burns – (January 20, 1896-March 9, 1996) An Academy-Award winning Jewish-American actor and comedian George Burns was a man filled with joy. He and his wife Gracie Allen would frequently team up on radio and television which made them both well known. George was an entertainer until a few years before his 100th birthday. Dyslexia never kept him from being who he was, a legend who had one of the longest American careers in show business history.

Hans Christian Andersen –  (April 2 1805 – August 4 1875)  Being an author of children’s fantasy stories, he was a victim of dyslexia and showed the world that when you want something, nothing can stop you from obtaining it. The books that he wrote have been translated into hundreds of different languages and continue to be distributed even today in millions of copies. Hans wrote books such as “The Emperor’s New Clothes”, “The Princess and the Pea” “Thumbelina”, “The Snow Queen”, “The Ugly Duckling” and “The Little Mermaid”.

Henry Winkler – Henry Franklin Winkler (born October 30, 1945) is a Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer and author. He is perhaps most famous for his role as Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli on the popular sitcom Happy Days (1974-1984). Winkler attended the McBurney School and received his bachelor’s degree from Emerson College in 1967 and his MFA from the Yale School of Drama in 1970. In 1978, Emerson gave Winkler an honorary doctorate of humane letters. Winkler has also received a Doctor of Humane Letters from Austin College. Having struggled throughout his school years with unidentified dyslexia Winkler, at age 31, finally understood what he’d been grappling with all his life, when making a documentary about dyslexia, Winkler himself found that he was dyslexic.

Jackie Stewart – Sir John Young Stewart, OBE (born 11 June 1939 in Milton, West Dunbartonshire), better known as Jackie, and nicknamed The Flying Scot, is a Scottish former racing driver. He competed in Formula One between 1965 and 1973, winning three World Drivers’ Championships. Former F1 champion Sir Jackie Stewart, said he thought he was “thick” at school before discovering he was dyslexic. Sir Jackie said “word blindness” meant he had to race to keep up with other pupils. In those days dyslexia wasn’t something that got identified in many schools.

Leonardo Da Vinci – Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was a Tuscan polymath: scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, botanist, musician and writer. As an engineer, Leonardo conceived ideas vastly ahead of his own time, conceptualising a helicopter, a tank, concentrated solar power, a calculator, and the double hull, and outlining a rudimentary theory of plate tectonics. He also had the gift of dyslexia. Most of the time, he wrote his notes backwards. Although unusual, this is a trait shared by many left-handed dyslexic people. Most of the time, dyslexic writers are not even consciously aware that they are writing this way.

Magic Johnson – Earvin Effay Johnson, Jr. (born August 14, 1959 in Lansing, Michigan) is a retired American National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers. Johnson is acknowledged as one of the most popular NBA basketball players of all time, being well-known for his uncanny passing and dribbling skills, and for his cheerful nature on and off the court. In the words of Magic Johnson: “The looks, the stares, the giggles . . . I wanted to show everybody that I could do better and also that I could read.”

Thomas Edison – Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor of Dutch origin and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. In school, the young Edison’s mind often wandered. He was noted to be terrible at mathematics, unable to focus, and had difficulty with words and speech. This ended Edison’s three months of official schooling. The cause of Edison’s deafness has been attributed to a bout of scarlet fever during childhood and recurring untreated middle ear infections. Thomas Edison was dyslexic, a problem child, and a mischief-maker.  He talked when he was supposed to be listening and did not listen when the teacher talked. He had no patience. He was not well-coordinated and did poorly in sports. He applied himself with a passion to whatever caught his attention, but his attention was easily diverted.

Tom Cruise – Thomas Cruise Mapother IV (born July 3, 1962), more commonly known as Tom Cruise, is an American actor and film producer. Cruise has said that he suffered from abuse as a child. This was partially due to him suffering from dyslexia. He stated that when something went wrong, his father came down hard on him. Having gone through fifteen schools in twelve years, Cruise, who dropped his father’s name at age twelve, was also a victim of bullying at school.

Walt Disney – Walter Elias Disney (December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966) was an American film producer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, animator, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. Disney is notable as one of the most influential and innovative figures in the field of entertainment during the twentieth century. Walt Disney had dyslexia, which is a learning disorder characterized by reading difficulties. While Walt Disney was attending high school he also went to the Academy of Fine Arts. This caused him to have double the school work than an average student on top of  the fact that he also dealt with being dyslexic.

Whoopi Goldberg – Whoopi Goldberg (born November 13, 1955) is an American actress, comedian, radio host, TV personality, game show host, and author. Whoopi Goldberg was born Caryn Elaine Johnson in New York City. Whoopi had a lot of difficulty in school, but it was not until she was an adult did she learn that she had dyslexia. Despite her dyslexia, Whoopi Goldberg has gone on to have a highly successful film and television career.

Winston Churchill – Churchill described himself as having a “speech impediment”, which he consistently worked to overcome. After many years, he finally stated, “My impediment is no hindrance.” Although the Stuttering Foundation of America has claimed that Churchill stammered, the Churchill Centre has concluded that he lisped. Churchill’s impediment may also have been cluttering, which would fit more with his lack of attention to unimportant details and his very secure ego. According to several sources Winston Churchill was not dyslexic and had no learning disability whatsoever. In his autobiography he played up his low grades at Harrow, undoubtedly to convince readers, and possibly himself, how much he had overcome; but in this he exaggerated. He was actually quite good at subjects he enjoyed and in fact won several school prizes.

Woodrow Wilson – Former president of the United States. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856-February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. Wilson did not learn to read until he was about 12 years old. His difficulty reading may have indicated dyslexia or A.D.D., but as a teenager he taught himself shorthand to compensate and was able to achieve academically through determination and self-discipline. He studied at home under his father’s guidance and took classes in a small school in Augusta.

Fanny Flagg – (born September 21, 1944) is an American author and actress. Flagg has spoken publicly about being dyslexic. Flagg has said she was enormously challenged as a writer because she was “severely dyslexic and couldn’t spell. So I was discouraged from writing and embarrassed”. Her burgeoning writing career was put on hold for much of the 1970s, but Flagg overcame her fear and completed several novels and screenplays.

George Patton – George Smith Patton GCB, KBE (November 11, 1885 – December 21, 1945) was a leading U.S. Army general in World War II in campaigns in North Africa, Sicily, France, and Germany, 1943-1945. Patton not begin his formal education until age 11, most likely due to dyslexia. Patton attended high school in Pasedena. Upon graduation, Patton was accepted at the Virginia Military Institute. He spent a year at VMI before being accepted to West Point.

Harry Belafonte – Harold George Belafonte, Jr. (born March 1, 1927) is an American musician, actor and social activist. One of the most successful Jamaican musicians in history, he was dubbed the “King of Calypso” for popularizing the Caribbean musical style in the 1950s. Due to problems with dyslexia, Belafonte dropped out of high school and at the age of 17, he joined the US Navy for a couple of years. After that, he returned to New York and settled there. Belafonte became involved with the American Negro Theatre and soon began singing in clubs around the city.

Richard Branson – Sir Richard Charles Nicholas Branson (born 18 July 1950) is an English entrepreneur, best known for his Virgin brand of over 360 companies. Richard Branson has been involved in a number of world record-breaking attempts since 1985, when in the spirit of the Blue Riband he attempted to cross the Atlantic Ocean in the fastest recorded time. Branson has dyslexia, resulting in poor academic performance as a student. School was something of a nightmare for him. He was the captain of football, rugby union and cricket teams, and by the age of fifteen he had started two ventures that eventually failed, one growing Christmas trees and another raising budgerigars.

Nelson Rockefeller – Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was the forty-first Vice President of the United States, governor of New York, philanthropist, and businessman. Rockefeller was born in Bar Harbor, Maine. He was the son of John Davison Rockefeller, Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. He was the grandson of Standard Oil’s founder and chairman John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. Nelson Rockefeller died on the evening of Friday, January 26, 1979 at age 70 from a heart attack under circumstances whose details have never been completely revealed.

Neil Bush – Neil Mallon Bush (born January 22, 1955 in Midland, Texas) is the fourth of six children of former President George Herbert Walker Bush and Barbara Bush (Barbara Lane Pierce). Neil is the younger brother of President George Walker Bush, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, and the late Robin Bush. At age 11, he entered the exclusive private St. Albans School in Washington, DC. He struggled through school. A counselor told his mother that it was doubtful the boy had the potential to graduate. He was later diagnosed as having dyslexia, and his mother spent much time coaching him through his learning disability. Eventually his grades improved and he graduated from St. Albans in 1973.

It is a good thing that these people didn’t quite trying to overcome their problems and just plain give up. See what they accomplished, and in doing so, showed  to the world what it can be done if you really try!