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Posts Tagged ‘Interesting’

RVing-Casino/Campgrounds(5,6)

In Information-Usefull, postaweek2011, RVing on April 30, 2011 at 1:57 am

Casino Queen Hotel  Casino RV Park (East  St. Louis, Illinois)

From a lawn chair in their campsites, RVers can look across the mighty Mississippi River and watch the setting sun bathe the St Louis Arch in golden light.

Casino Queen RV Park

Casino Queen RV Park


In the foreground of this gorgeous vista sits the Casino Queen Hotel and Casino, a short shuttle-ride away from the RV sites, some of which are 70 feet long and all of  which are carefully maintained. Although the 142-site RV park is closed  November through February, the Casino is open tear round, and Casino Player magazine has consistently rated the Casino Queen’s  slots among the  country’s loosest. The fact that the Casino also offers $2 blackjack and 25 cent roulette doesn’t tip the odds in the players  favor, but it certainly eases the pain of a losing streak.

Casion Queen RV Park

Of course, if  RVers decide to stay at the Casino Queen RV Park, they will likely feel victorious on all fronts if they watch one of the casino’s  shows, eat at its  fine Prime Steakhouse and explore the nearby  St. Louis Zoo, the Science Center as well              as Laciede’s  Landing. 



Casino Queen RV Park (800) 777-0777,www.casinoqueen.com

Coushatta Casino Resort/Red Shoes RV Park (Kinder,Louisiana)

Palm Trees at Coushatta RV Resort


In the southwestern part of the Pelican State, 23 miles north of I-10, sits an establishment that understands quality and delivers it in spades. And hearts and clubs and diamonds. Coushatta Casino Resort features more than 2,800 slot machines, more fhan 70 table games and a 22-table poker room,where Texas Hold’em can be played legally,unlike in the neighboring Lone Star State. The entertainers who play Coushatta include the biggest of big names, such as Reba McEntire, and the casino features six restaurants under its roof. The adjacent golf course, Koasati Pines at Coushatta, may be a tongue-twister, but it also has received a 4.5-star rating from Golf Digest, and golfing RVer will likely warm to the fairways that wind  through wetlands among pines and the live oaks.

Indian Dance ai Coushatta




The adjacent Red Shoes RV Park has enough amenities –a two acre lake, tennis, basketball, volleyball and shuffleboard courts; a swimming pool, and two bathhouses, for example–to entertain those travelers who do not gamble or play golf. Though only about 300 yards sit between the casino and the RV park,a shuttle makes the trip easier, increasing the time in which to strike it rich.

Caushatta RV Park


Coushatta Casino Resort, (800) 572- 7263-www.coushattacasinoresort.com

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Chuckle for the day!

Freya was driving her Chevrolet Vega home in New Mexico when she saw an elderly Apache woman walking along the side of the road. She stopped the car and asked the woman if she would like a lift?
With a silent nod, the woman climbed into the car. Freya tried in vain to make conversation with the Apache woman.
The old Apache looked closely at everything she saw, studying every little detail, until she noticed a red gift bag on the seat next to Freya.
‘What’s in the bag?’ asked the old woman.
‘It’s a bottle of whisky that I got for my husband.’
The Apache woman was silent for another minute or two. Then speaking with the quiet wisdom of an elder, she said, ‘Good trade.’

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Up,Up, and Away!

In Uncategorized on April 28, 2011 at 1:30 am

Las Vegas

MGM Las Vegas

Here  we are here in Beautiful, Las Vegas, NV. This is the starting place for our much awaited “Up,Up and away” Balloon Festival Caravan, which ends in  Albuquerque, NM. in three weeks. We came here a week early so we could see some shows and other sights. One thing that I noticed that was interesting-the street signs are lighted so you can read them at night. I am glad that we did decide to give ourselves an extra week  because there is so much more to Las Vegas than just the the gambling. Carol has joined up with her friends   from N.Y.   June and I saw three shows and investigated the  Las Vegas area in general. We had to check out of our first camp  site here at the campground and moved over to where the caravan group of ” Up,Up and away ” are meeting. They have reserved camp sites. ( We had stayed at our first camp site  for 7 days and it only cost us, with gambling credits, $85.00 ).

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Today we relocated over to a new site assigned to us by our wagon master. After we got set up, we drove over to the Casino to a meeting room where we registered. We have been given #20 for this caravan. There are 24 units in this group. We returned again at 2:30 pm for the orientation meeting and to meet  our fellow travelers. The bus picked us up at 5:00pm and took us to the Excalibur Casino where we were treated to; “King Arthur’s Tourament.” with dinner and show. The dinner was served Medieval style – no utensils. A pewter mug & soup bowl. You drank soup from the bowl and ate a Cornish hen & a hunk of bread with your fingers while cheering your favorite knight on to victory in the tournament. The tables were arranged around an arena where the knights on horses competed. We had a great time!

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The next day the bus picked us up at 8:15 am for a boat ride on Lake Meade and a tour of Hoover Dam. The bus ride over gave us another chance to get better aqcuainted with our fellow travelers. The bus driver did a great job of keeping us informed about everything from “who owns what in Vegas” to stories about the building of Hoover Dam. (Our driver was an English Gentleman, not American and he did a great job). The boat trip was enjoyable. The Hoover Dam was certainly worth going to. It was started in 1931 and finished in 1935, two years ahead of schedule and one and a half million dollars under budget. (Total cost was 165 million dollars).

The 17 generators generate over two million Kilowatts—that is a lot of power. After we got back to the campground we had a travel meeting with Pat & Ken (wagon masters). They covered our next trip and what to expect on the road. We are free now until tomorrow. Carol’s friends are here and she is happy.

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Today  we are leaving Silverton’s  RV Park, Las Vegas, N V. For;    Brentwood RV Resort, Hurricane,UT. (You  do not travel in a group caravan, but singly or pairs etc ) . We gave the Las Vegas traffic a chance to thin out on I-15 north before we left. There is major construction going on here “to by-pass I-15 out to near the mountains” because here, in Las Vegas, it so loaded down with local traffic. I drove so June could enjoy the beautiful scenery of the Virgin River Gorge. We decided that because we only have about 100 miles to drive tomorrow, that we would briefly sight-see Zion Nat’l Park in the  morning before we left..We went down to the “before travel meeting”at  Pat & Kens RV and got some ideas of what to look for tomorrow at Zion Nat’l Park from some of our group who went this  afternoon.

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We are leaving Brentwood RV Resort,Hurricane,UT.  For; Panguitch KOA Park, Panguitch,UT. We pulled our RV over to an overflow area and dropped it off. We drove  34 miles to Zion Nat’l Park this morning.

Zion Nat'l Park

We got there at 8:45am and the visitors center was open. We toured the center and picked up any infornation we needed and left for the Park. We drove around the Park and it was great.We drove over to the “River Walk”,walking trail just as it started to rain so we returned to the park and picked up our RV. We headed out to our next park. The scenery on the way was outstanding.The Park put on a good ” ice cream get together” at 6:00 pm. We won a coffee cup on one of the drawings, (Everyone won something).

I started to set the alarm for 6:00am, but June talked me into changing it to 7:00am so she could get a little more sleep. At 7:00am I got up, turned on the heater & coffee. There was frost on top of the cars (and we were complaining about the heat  just yesterday and running the a/c). We drove into Bryce Canyon Nat’l Park around noon and drove out to the end at Rainbow Point, checked out the visitors center, then drove back,  stopping at all of the “Over-looks”, 18 miles at 35 mph (thePark speed limit). All of the overlooks are on the  return side of the road

Bryce Canyon

.The views from all of the over-looks were just out-standing. Bryce is not really a canyon, but “14 Amphitheaters of color-eroded limestone pinnacles and spires called Hoodoos”. The Red, Pink and Orange colors of the limestone constantly change with the sun, making the landscape come alive. The Indians called it “Red Rocks Standing Like Men in a Bowl-ShapedCanyon”. Indian legend has it that long ago there lived in the area, animal-like creatures that could change into people. “They were evil so Coyote turned them all into Stone”. On the way back we fueled up. We had a Bar-B-Que at the park. It was very good. We had our travel meeting afterwards. >

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We are leaving Panguitch, KOA Park, Panguitch, UT. For; Canyonland Campground, Moab, UT. There can be no question, but that it is cold this morning. 25 degrees F. We were the last ones out of the campground, as usual. My sweet wife did a great job of starting of us out on our trip. She topped the summit at Fishlake Nat’l Park (not our stop), at 7,923 ft. with no problem at all. We chose not to take the senic, by way of  Rte-12 & Rte-24, because of the steep grades reported  up to 12 % from my  Mountain Dictionary- Ken was told that the dictionary was wrong, that there no grades steeper than 8%. The people that did go that way said that we made a good decision, because there were 12%  grades that we would have had  major problems  with.  (I,m glad that we have a Mountain Directionary, it sure does come in handy.) We had a very scenic trip going US-89, I-70 & Rte-191. We pulled into an “over-view ” for lunch. The view from there was out-standing. We met some of our group when we fueled up at Green River. We tried to join them, but they ran off and left us. We checked into the campground and set up. Very short sites and kind of cramped with trees. Tomorrow we are going white water rafting on the Colorado River. >

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We are up and ready to go White Water Rafting on the Colorado River today.

Jetting the Colorado

The Colorado River

With memories of the White Water Rafting trip that we took several years ago on the Penobscot River in Maine, we were ready when the bus picked us up at 8:00am. We were on the first trip. The other half wanted to see the “Arches”, some 30 miles away. We knew that it wasn’t going to be as exciting as the “Penobscot River” trip when we didn’t get helmets and the guide was the only one with an oar. However, it was fun, with beautiful scenery. Our  guide did a excellent job explaining the landscape as we went downriver. ( The only bad thing about the trip was the “Port-a potty”. Man-O-Man, was that “Ripe” ). After the rafting trip was over, we returned to the campground. I think that we have a couple of  “glo-plugs” bad. I have been plugging in the crankcase heater each night and the truck starts on the coldest mornings with no problems.

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Today we got up, had breakfast and got ready for our trip down the Colorado River on a Jet Boat. The Bus picked us up at 11:00am and took us down stream about 15 miles from where we went rafting. The canyons in this area are fantastic. When we arrived at the Boat Launch Area, they had  a Picknic Table set up under some trees with lunch . After lunch, we boarded the  Jet Boats and headed down River. The canyons were unbelivable! Our guide John stopped several times to give us a Geology lessons on the different layers of formations. He appeared to be very knowledgeable and he certainly had our interest. We took a lot of pictures on the trip. On the way we stopped at an area of wall covered with black magnesium oxide. There were some petroglyphs etched through the black into the Red sandstone….when we got back to our campground and got cleaned up, we took our crock- pot over to our groups pot luck dinner. It was good. Today is June’s Birthday. Everyone sang “Happy Birthday” to her and she got a bunch of cards which made her very happy. >

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We are leaving Canyanland campground, Moab,UT for:United campground, Duranango,Co. This morning everyone had to take turns pulling out. Because of the short camp sites, the 5th wheel trucks stuck out into the road, so they pulled out first. June was driving the 1st half of the trip. She never got out of 3rd gear for the first 20 minutes. we were climbing from 4,000ft to 6,000ft. It was a pretty much an  un-eventful trip. We finally got to the campground and checked in. >

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We were up at 5:00 am to get ready for our 7:00am Bus trip down to the train station in Durango. From there we take a narrow gauge Railroad train ride to  Silverton, Co., up in the mountains. We will return this afternoon by Bus. The train ride itself wasn’t too comfortable, but the scenery was great. It was a 31/2 hour ride on hard narrow straight back seats. Open the window and you get covered with soo. We had 2 1/2 hours to look around Silverton before the bus  picked us up for the trip back. There really isn’t much up here but restaurants, Gift Shops and history. June bought presents for our kids. >

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We are going to Mesa Verde Nat’l Park. It is about a 45 minute trip to get to the visitors center.  We had our own guide on the bus and he was very knowledgeable.

Mesa Verde Cliff Dwellers

At  Mesa Verde are  ancient multistoried dwellings that fill the cliff-rock alcoves that may rise 2,000 ft. above Montezuma valley. The Anasazi (Ancient Ones) began to settle on the top about AD 750. Around 1200 they moved into the recesses in the cliffs. Around 1270 they moved out for unknown reasons.They had a high degree of skills as craftmen. The condition of the dwellings today confirms this. We returned back pretty well worn out. >

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We are leaving United Campground, Durango,Co. for; Gouldings Motel & RV Park, Monument Valley,UT. The first 20 miles we stayed in 3rd gear because it was a little hilly. We arrived with only about 1/4 of our fuel left in our tanks. We were driving into a head wind most of the way. (This is why we carry two spare 12 gallon cans of diesel, protected in the back ). The scenery from our campsite overlooking MonumentValley is wonderful.

I will bet that you didn’t know!

In Interesting Information, Uncategorized on April 14, 2011 at 12:16 am

You’re gonna say, “I didn’t know that!”  at least 5 times. Really neat stuff here.

(Alaska) More than half of the coastline of the entire United States is in Alaska.

(Chicago) Next to Warsaw, Chicago has the largest Polish population in the world.

(Detroit) Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan, carries the designation M-1, so named because it was the first paved road anywhere.

(Damascus,  Syria) Damascus, Syria, was flourishing a couple of thousand years before Rome was founded in 753 BC, making it the oldest continuously inhabited city in existence.

(Istanbul,  Turkey) Istanbul, Turkey, is the only city in the world located on two continents.

(Los  Angeles) Los  Angeles ‘  full name is: El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles de  Porciuncula– and can be abbreviated to 3.63% of its size: L.A.

(New  York  City) The term ‘The Big Apple’ was coined by touring  jazz  musicians of the 1930s who used the slang expression ‘apple’ for any town or city. Therefore, to play New York  City is to play the  big time – The Big Apple.

There are more Irish in New York City than in Dublin, Ireland; more Italians in New York  City than in  Rome, Italy; and more Jews in New York  City than in Tel  Aviv , Israel.

(Ohio) There are no natural lakes in the state of Ohio, every one is manmade.

(Pitcairn  Island) The smallest island with country status is Pitcairn in  Polynesia, at just 1.75  sq. miles/4,53 sq. km.

(Rome) The first city to reach a population of 1 million people was Rome, Italy in 133 B.C.  There is a city called Rome on every continent.

(Siberia) Siberia contains more than 25% of the world’s forests.

(S.M.O.M.) The actual smallest sovereign entity in the world is the Sovereign Military Order of Malta  (S.M.O.M). It is located in the city of Rome, Italy, has an area of two tennis courts.

Nantucket as a Duty Station!

In Information-Interesting on April 10, 2011 at 6:45 pm
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Charles M. Morgan-Whaling Ship

The last year of my enlistment (1953) was fantastic. I was assigned to the Loran station at Siasconset on Nantucket Island , off the coast of Massachusetts.  We rented a two bedroom house right on the beach in Siasconset, between the ocean and the bluffs. What a stroke of luck we had here. In looking for a place to bring my wife with our  five month old  son, I came across a  Lady (who lived off of the Island) and who had just bought an old house that had not been lived in for the past ten years, as an investment. I needed a house to live in and she needed her investment  fixed up. We came to an agreement. She would buy the necessary supplies and I would repair and paint the inside of the house. I would also paint the outside trim and make any other repairs necessary.In exchange I would pay a very reasonable rent.

We absolutely fell in love with Nantucket and with the Islanders. We met and became friends with several families. We had  cook outs and played cards with our new friends and covered about every part of the island from lighthouses to swimming beaches.We found relatives I didn’t know we had, wanting to visit for a week- end during the summer!. In the winter we collected driftwood and any thing else that came ashore after a storm. We hired out in the spring to help the summer people to open their homes, doing cleaning , painting and small repairs in our spare time.

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Here are some very brief facts  and history of Nantucket Island!

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Nantucket cobble stone streets

The National Historic District  has architecturally changed very little since the 17th century.  Seaside cottages and old-fashioned lamps still line its streets.

The three Brothers Buildings

At the harbor front, where the great whaling ships set out on their hazardous journeys to return years later – if at all -is now filled with  pleasure boats that find safe harbor in one of the finest docking facilities in the world.

When you go inland on this idyllic “elbow of sand,” the wild moors open to the endless sky. Nearly 40 percent of Nantucket Island is protected conservation land. Several areas and habitats, natural groups of plants and animals, are rare to this region and even the world.

Walk the wide sandy beaches, as beautiful as any in the world. Swim in the still, cool, sparkling waters of Nantucket Sound to the north. Sign on for a guided tour of the island or pick up a picnic lunch and rent a bike or a jeep and discover Nantucket  for yourself. (A 4-wheel jeep will get you to places that you can not possibility take a car without getting stuck in the beach sand).

Restaurants abound whether for a beach picnic, an informal meal, or gourmet fare in sophistic surrounding, there is something for everyone. How about a clambake prepared to your order. Fresh Nantucket bay scallop, provides unforgettable dining.

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Originally a booming whaling port, Nantucket has been named a National Historic District and has architecturally changed little since the 17th century.

The island’s beginnings in western history can be  traced to its reported sighting by Norsemen in the 11th century. But  it was not until 1602  that Captain Bartholomew Gosnold of  Falmouth, England sailed his bark, Concord, past the bluffs of Siasconset and really put Nantucket on the map. The island’s  original inhabitants, the Wampanoag Indians, lived undisturbed until 1641 when the island was deeded by the English (the authorities in control of the land from the coast of Maine to New York) to Thomas Mayhew and his son, merchants of Watertown and Martha’s Vineyard.

As Europeans began to settle in the area around Cape Cod, the island became a place of refuge for regional Indians, as Nantucket was not yet discovered by white men. The growing population of  Native Americans welcomed seasonal groups of  Indians who traveled to the  island to fish and later harvest whales that washed up on shore. At this time, the true demise of the island’s Indian population began. The English presence drastically changed the healthy Indian population and over the next century, the Wampanoag would be weakened by disease, alcohol and servitude.

Before ultimately settling on the shores of the Great Harbor, the new English settlers moved to the land surrounding the small sheltered harbor of Capaum Pond, on the north shore, where the first white settlement, Sherburne, was established. In 1795, the town (now nestled on the Great Harbor) was named Nantucket (Wampanoag for “faraway land”) and became unique in the country as an island, a county and a town, all with the same name. Shortly after 1700, Quakerism began to take root and by the end of the eighteenth century, the  society of friends was the major denomination on the island, a refuge for Quakers being persecuted in other areas of the Bay Colony. The Nantucket Quakers also became extremely influential in business and government matters. The simple, sturdy dwellings have been continuously occupied and stand today in pristine ranks along cobblestone Main Street and other lanes and byways. Later, with the influence generated by the whaling industry, merchants and  master mariners built their homes with an eye to impress their neighbors.

For nearly a 100 years-from the mid-1700’s to the late 1830’s, the island was the whaling capital of the world ,  with as many as 150 ships making port in Nantucket during its peak. Within decades, however, the new wealth from whale oil drastically took a turn for the worst, upon the advent of petroleum in 1838 when it began to replace whale oil as an illuminate, and the sperm whale itself had been harder to find. In 1846, a “Great Fire” roared through Nantucket Town under the cover of night, leaving hundreds homeless and impoverished. When gold was discovered in California, shiploads of Nantucketers left to seek new fortunes. In the thirty years of 1840 to 1870, census figures document the loss of 60 percent of the island’s population, which plunged from an estimated 10,000 to 4,000. The death knell for whaling had been sounded. The last ship outbound from Nantucket in search of the giant sperm whale left in 1869, never to return to her home port.

Passenger Ship

Nantucket Island

Nantucket was a port-of-call for transatlantic packets and coastal vessels from the early 1800’s and, indeed, ranked third only after New York and Boston as a  major port. When the whaling era ended, commercial shipping gave way to recreational boating. Daily excursions from the mainland on the graceful old steamers brought a new breed to Nantucket – the summer visitors. The first generation of “developers” on Nantucket sang the praises of pure air and saltwater bathing for health and pleasure. They built cottages and summer houses, advertising them in the Boston and New York newspapers. Island housewives took in summer boarders and great hotels were built in town, as well as on the seashore at Brant Point, Surfside, and Siasconset. It was not until around 1990 that the american tradition of summer vacations was firmly established, and it was then that Nantucket was discovered to be just about the ideal spot for vacationing. Once entrenched, tourism became the principle source of income for island residents. It still is and in the last two decades Nantucket’s tourist season has extended from before Memorial Day to after Columbus Day, Increasingly, visitors are also attracted by the quiet beauty of the off-season, and can be assured of finding comfortable accommodations no matter what time of year.

A word of caution if you are driving on the “cobblestone” streets of Nantucket, drive slow! The cobblestones’ will jar your teeth loose!

(Most of the above information  came from Nantucket Island Chamber of Commerce.